Topics Related to Highway Markers

A man whose photographs of the North Carolina mountains played a crucial role in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park soon will be recognized with a new North Carolina Highway Historical Marker in Asheville.

A new Highway Historical Marker soon will commemorate North Carolina’s oldest State Historic Site.

An act of civil disobedience soon will be recognized with a new North Carolina Highway Historical Marker in Roanoke Rapids.

The marker commemorates the actions of Sarah Keys and the subsequent lawsuit in 1952 that shaped the federal prohibition of segregation during interstate travel.

A pastor who wrote a key eyewitness account of 1898 Wilmington Coup soon will be recognized with a new North Carolina Highway Historical Marker in Wilmington.

An important but long-overlooked event from the Civil War in North Carolina soon will get a new North Carolina Highway Historical Marker in Elizabeth City.

The North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program recently established a partnership with the non-profit North Carolina Literary and Historical Association for a historical marker maintenance endowment fund.

The contributions of more than 1,800 women pilots during World War II soon will be commemorated with a North Carolina Highway Historical Marker.

A historical marker commemorating the life of a renowned immigrant architect and builder soon will be installed near the site of his Black Mountain estate.

A new opportunity to support the North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program will help repair or replace damaged historical highway markers.

The North Carolina Civil Rights Trail is proud to announce that three historical markers will be added to the trail system following the first round of applications. Applications for the second round are now open.