Topics Related to Stories from North Carolina's Black History

Though they both became New Yorkers during the course of their lives, jazz masters Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane had North Carolina roots that ran deep. 

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history.

In the early twentieth century, Parrish Street in Durham constituted what today would be called an enterprise zone, propelled by the Bull City’s African American businessmen. Nationally recognized, the district acquired the nickname “Black Wall Street.”

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history.

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history.

Civil War-era New Bern has often been called a “Mecca for freedom.” Seized by Federal forces in 1862, the city quickly became a refugee center for thousands of slaves seeking freedom behind Union lines. Near the close of the war the community was renamed James City. 

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history.

 Thomas Day, a cabinetmaker by trade, is perhaps the most celebrated of North Carolina’s antebellum craftsmen.

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit from our state’s African American’s past.

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit from our state's African American's past.